Tag Archives: Living in the UK

Got non-EEA Dependents? Money & Not Love Will Conquer All

On 11 June 2012 the Government announced changes to the Immigration Rules for non-European Economic Area (non-EEA) nationals applying to enter or remain in the UK on the family migration route. The changes came into effect for new applicants from the 9th July 2012 and were a response to the pressure on the government to reduce the number of immigrants. The expectation of the Home Office was that the changes would significantly reduce the number of family visas. The full details of the changes are available on UKBA’s website.

An All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) Family Migration enquiry was launched on 20 November 2012 to explore the impact of the new rules and their report was released yesterday. The main focus of the enquiry was on the following point:

The new minimum income requirement of £18,600 for British nationals and permanent residents (‘UK sponsors’) seeking to sponsor a non-EEA spouse or partner, rising to £22,400 to sponsor a child in addition and a further £2,400 for each further child included in the application; and the new rules on sponsorship of non-EEA adult dependents applying to come to the UK.

Over 280 submissions were received by the inquiry committee, including over 175 submissions from families who had been adversly affected by the rules. Charities, lawyers, local authorities, businesses and MPs submitted written evidence.
The key official findings are:

  1. Some British citizens and permanent residents in the UK, including people in full-time employment, have been separated from a non-EEA partner and in some cases their children as a result of the income requirement.
  2. Some British citizens and permanent residents have been prevented from returning to
    the UK with their non-EEA partner and any children as a result of the income requirement.
  3. Some children, including British children, have been indefinitely separated from a non-EEA parent as a result of the income requirement.
  4. The current permitted sources in order to meet the income requirement may not fully
    reflect the resources available to some families.
  5. The adult dependent relative visa category appears in effect to have been closed.

In general it is the rigid enforcement of the rules that is the problem. The proposed migrant’s salary cannot be taken into account when calculating the £18,600 even if they have a high salary. In practical terms it means that people with a right to live here cannot bring their high earning partner to live with them if they themselves are not working. They may be looking after their children and have no plans to work or to become a drain on the public purse. If their children were born in a non-EEA country and require a visa the bar to entry is set even higher. The UK misses out on the skills of the ‘dependent’ migrant and the income tax revenue from their high salary. Some people have had to claim benefits when that was never their plan and their children are then growing up in a low income one parent family. In parts of the UK average income levels are well below £18,600 and so that level of income is then not achievable.

The APPG Migration Group had this to say

We urge Government to consider the emerging evidence about what must be the unintended consequences of these rules, and hope they will agree the need fully to review whether, one year on from their introduction, these rules have struck the right balance between different interests.

Increasingly young people are working abroad as part of their career development and when starting a personal relationship are probably not thinking about the complexities of immigrations systems. It would be odd if they were. In the first flush of romance they are more likely to believe that love conquers all.

Do you need a visa to work in IT, Engineering or Finance?

To find out more about our solutions call now on 0800 294 4388 or Send us some details now and we will get right back to you!
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The National Health Service

If you travel to the UK to take employment while on a temporary work visa (e.g. Tier 2 General, Tier 1 General, Tier 5 Youth Mobility) you are entitled to free medical treatment on the National Health Service.

However, entitlement to free NHS treatment is not free for everyone as it depends upon the length and purpose of your residence in the United Kingdom, not your nationality.

Are you planning to come to the UK to work as a professional Contractor? Would like to find out about maximising your contract income or working towards a future visa extension? If so Commonwealth Contractors can help!

To discuss your situation with an experienced advisor call Commonwealth Contractors now on 0800 294 4388 or Submit your Details and we will get right back to you!

Treatment which is always free to all

Some hospital treatment is free to all regardless of residence. Free treatment includes:

  • Treatment for Accidents and Emergencies
  • Compulsory Psychiatric Treatment
  • Treatment for communicable diseases including Tuberculosis, Cholera, Food Poisoning, Malaria, Meningitis, HIV etc
  • Family Planning Service

Foreign Individuals eligible for free NHS Treatment

Certain foreign nationals (and their dependents) can receive NHS hospital treatment free of charge, including:

Those that have been living in the UK for at least 12 months
Those that have come to the UK to take up permanent residence or have been granted leave to enter or remain as a spouse
Those that have come to the UK to work. This does not include short business trips
Students who are following a course of study which lasts at least six months

Registering with a General Practitioner (GP)

If you are eligible to register with a GP you should do so (at your local practice) as soon as possible.

You should visit the GP’s surgery to register and make them aware that you wish to register as a NHS patient and that you are a foreign national. Be sure to take as much documentary evidence as possible to prove you eligibility for free NHS treatment e.g. Work Permit, Passport, Approval Letter etc. You will need to complete some forms and you will be asked about the duration of your stay.

Please note that registering with a GP does not give you automatic entitlement to free NHS treatment at a hospital. The hospital providing treatment is responsible for establishing if you are entitled to treatment without charge.

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To find out more about Commonwealth Contractors call now on 0800 294 4388 or Submit your Details and we will get right back to you!

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Applying for a National Insurance Number

If you have just arrived in the UK on a temporary work visa it is important that you set about applying for a National Insurance Number as soon as possible. A National Insurance Number or NI number is a unique reference number that relates to your Income Tax & National Insurance records.

PLEASE NOTE THAT COMMMONWEALTH CONTRACTORS DO NOT DEAL WITH NI NUMBER APPLICATIONS – PLEASE CONTACT JOBCENTRE PLUS ON 0845 600 0643.

Are you planning to come to the UK to work as a professional Contractor? Would like to find out about maximising your contract income or working towards a future visa extension? If so Commonwealth Contractors can help!

To discuss your situation with an experienced advisor call Commonwealth Contractors now on 0800 294 4388 or Submit your Details and we will get right back to you!

How do I apply for a National Insurance Number?

In order to get a National Insurance Number you need to attend a 10 minute meeting with an advisor at a Jobcentre Plus.

The meeting should only be arranged once you have started work as you will require a letter of employment.

To book a meeting with an advisor call Jobcentre Plus on 0845 600 0643 between 8am to 6 pm, Monday to Friday.

The advisor will inform you of the documents you need to bring to the meeting (please see the document list below) and assign a time.

What documents are required?

In order to apply for a National Insurance Number you should prepare some of the following documents:

  • Passport
  • Full Driving Licence
  • Birth Certificate
  • Marriage Certificate
  • Tenancy Agreement
  • Payslips
  • A Letter from your Employer
  • Contract of Employment

What happens after the meeting?

After the meeting with a Jobcentre Plus advisor you will be sent a letter detailing your National Insurance Number, so long as you have been successful.

Sometime after the letter a National Insurance card is sent to confirm the number.

Find out More

To find out more about Commonwealth Contractors call now on 0800 294 4388 or Submit your Details and we will get right back to you!

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Opening a UK Bank Account

One of the most important things to do on arriving in the UK is to set about opening a UK Bank Account so that you can start to receive your wages. If you’re a Non EEA National on a temporary work visa you may find this a little bit tricky initially if you don’t have an employer. (more…)

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Getting Around the UK

As a Contractor you may find that you have to move around the UK in order to get the best contracts. The good news is that getting around the country is very easy, and although the cost of travel is reasonable you may find ‘peak’ travel times (especially on trains) to be expensive. (more…)

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Renting Accommodation in the UK

If you’ve just arrived in the UK one of the first things you’ll need to do is find suitable accommodation. It can be a bit daunting trying to find a place right away so maybe stay with friends for a few weeks or extend your Hotel / B&B stay until you work out the best location for you. (more…)

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British Passports

To be eligible for a British Passport you MUST have British Nationality. If you are a highly skilled professional on a Tier 2 General visa you can apply for Permanent Residence in the UK after 5 years on Tier 2 General and then British Nationality after a further 1 year on Permanent Residence status. (more…)

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